SAAM to acquire Bell 206B-1 Kiowa A17-10…

Well, it’s official – Defence Disposals has awarded SAAM Kiowa A17-10 after a disposal tender process. The aircraft is presently at Damascus Barracks, Brisbane, and SAAM volunteers will collect it and arrange transport back to SAAM at the end of August.

The aircraft is not complete, but A17-10 is more complete than many of the disposals and we are confident that with a bit of parts foraging we will be able to present a complete display before too long. We plan to include the aircraft with Caribou A4-225 and Canberra WD954 nose section in a new Vietnam War exhibition. We’ll keep you posted on timing.

SAAM member Nigel Daw took the photos – 1/Holdsworthy 8/1/1972, 2/Oakey 6/8/1980 and 3/ Avalon 12/3/2009

SAAM takes delivery of donated Bell 206B Jet Ranger II…

SAAM volunteers loaded a Bell 206B Jet Ranger II donated by Hartwig Aviation at Parafield for transport to SAAM today 5th July. The donation was a legacy of Paul Daw, who facilitated it with Hartwig. This video shows Mark of Adelaide Heavy Haulage loading the aircraft at Parafield.

The aircraft, while incomplete, includes many parts SAAM will need to complete its Kiowa display when that aircraft is received from Defence Disposals (the acquisition is pending completion of a Deed of Transfer and payment to Defence). Our thanks to Hartwig Aviation for the donation and Adelaide Heavy Haulage for the transport.

WP_20170705_10_31_17_Pro from South Australian Aviation Museum on Vimeo.

SAAM’s Caribou moved to its final display position…

DHC4 Caribou A4-225 was jockeyed into its final position in our new 1,200 square metre display hangar today (1 July 2017). This was harder than it sounds because it involved much delicate manoeuvring with the tail swivelling in its raised “loft” section of the hangar. The aircraft is now angled to maximise available display space and allow attachment of the port wing.

 

 

More Progress on Caribou Reassembly!

SAAM volunteers reinstalled the rudder on DHC-4 Caribou A4-225 on 17 June 2017. This involved raising the nose to lower the tail to a workable height, lifting the rudder with our forklift, installing the bolts with a scissor lift on one side and work platform on the other, then carefully lowering the nose to make sure we had sufficient roof clearance as the tail rose. It was a close call, but our building design calculations proved correct and the top of the rudder fitted nicely under the raised roof of the eastern bay of our new display hangar. A fine piece of team work!