AP-3C Orion A9-756 positioned for reassembly!

Stephen Nitschke and Waynne Lee accomplished a big step in the assembly of AP-3C Orion A9-756 last night – simply by moving the 12 tonne fuselage from the centre of our new display hangar to be adjacent to the south wall. This created the space to attach the port wing.
It was no simple job though – Stephen designed and built a system of blocks and cables attached to the hangar wall columns so that the 3 trestles could be winched simultaneously under equal tension from a single point. This was vital to prevent twisting of the trestles or stress on the fuselage. This video shows how it was done.

The next task will be to attach the port wing. We will make further posts to update progress.

IMG_3464 from South Australian Aviation Museum on Vimeo.

AP-3C Orion A9-756 Fuselage, wing and tail section arrive at SAAM!

In a massive logistical exercise the major components of A9-756 were delivered from RAAF Base Edinburgh 92 Wing to SAAM on 10 December. Alltrans Transport and Nick’s Cranes did a magnificent job and the fuselage is now on trestles in our new display hangar with the wing, tail section, engines, propellers, radomes, control surfaces and a mass of parts all in storage at SAAM ready for the long and difficult job of reassembly.

This is the biggest aircraft by far in SAAM’s collection and will be a huge draw-card for the Museum.

Our thanks go to the Department of Defence Disposals, who accepted our tender for the aircraft; the RAAF, who helped facilitate the transfer of the aircraft; the Army Combat Service Support Section, who moved the six semitrailer loads of components; and finally Airbus Industries. Airbus Industries were responsible for dismantling the aircraft and they also sponsored it by donating $15,000 to assist us with the project. This much-appreciated generosity will be acknowledged by SAAM by dedicating display space to record the years of maintenance work performed by Airbus on both the Orion and Caribou aircraft.

AP-3C Orion A09-756 parts arrive at SAAM!

Six semi-trailers loaded with parts off the aircraft being disassembled at Edinburgh arrived at SAAM yesterday (23 Nov). We unloaded engines, propellers, nose and aft radomes, rudder, elevators, ailerons and flaps with the help of personnel from 1 Combat Service Support Battalion. Vaughn Wilds, the Orion Disposals Project Manager was along to direct operations. The fuselage arrives next month, then the immense project, for our all-volunteer organisation, starts to reassemble the aircraft for display.

SAAM is very grateful to all involved in this fantastic project to preserve RAAF heritage.

The video is of SAAM volunteers Walter Hill and Waynne Lee unloading one of the propellers.

Fairey Battle restoration gathers pace!

SAAM’s restoration/reconstruction of Fairey Battle N2188 is progressing well. Earlier this month the vertical fin, rudder and elevators were added to the horizontal stabilisers and aft fuselage section already assembled with the tailwheel and tail cone. The assembled structure gives a graphic demonstration of just how big this aircraft is going to be…

The assembly went well, although it took quite a number of volunteers to align the elevators for attachment as you can see in the smaller photograph!

The elevators are to be removed again to be fabric covered, then reattached with the various fuselage fairings installed.

SAAM joins UWAI !!

Now all our Chinese friends can scan our UWAI smart decal with their smartphones and learn all about us in their own language…

This smartphone app was launched by the SA Tourism Minister Leon Bignell on 8 September to help Chinese visitors navigate their way through SA’s tourism venues. We are very happy to be part of the network and look forward to welcoming more Chinese friends!

Progress on the CC-1 Replica restoration!

SAAM is making great progress on its restoration of the CC-1 replica, with the wings and tail surfaces patched/re-covered and re-attached to the aircraft.

The CC-1 is a replica of Clyde Cessna’s first design, built by Gordon Lewis and his engineers at Rossair from original plans in 1966 for the National Air Show. It was donated to SAAM by Gordon’s family a couple of years ago – so restoration is taking a little longer than the original build!

SAAM’s new display hangar officially opened by Senator David Fawcett..

 

 

SAAM’s new display hangar, part funded through the Australian Government’s National Stronger Regions Fund, was officially opened on behalf of the Commonwealth by Senator for South Australia Senator David Fawcett on Wednesday 30th August.

About 90 members and invited guests were on hand to hear SAAM President Pieter van Dyk, Mayor Gary Johanson of the Port Adelaide Enfield Council and Senator Fawcett address them. Senator Fawcett unveiled a commemorative plaque to officially open the hangar, and then toured the new hangar and the museum’s just completed Caribou display with other guests. They were also able to see the partially assembled Kiowa received from Defence Disposals just two days earlier. Our guests then joined us for a light lunch.

Among the guests were Mayor Gary Johanson, Bob Ahrens, Air Commodore Vincent (Joe) Lervasi, Jim Whalley and Roger Lang – all good friends of the museum.

Pictured is SAAM’s President, Pieter van Dyk, introducing Senator Fawcett to assembled guests.

Kiowa A17-010 lands at SAAM…

Kiowa A17/010 was loaded at Damascus Barracks on Friday and arrived safely at SAAM this afternoon (28 August).

SAAM volunteers unloaded the aircraft including tailboom, rotors and a case of parts, and it is now placed adjacent to Caribou A4-225 in our new display hangar.

Next – reassembly and restoration!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

More Progress on Caribou Reassembly!

SAAM volunteers reinstalled the rudder on DHC-4 Caribou A4-225 on 17 June 2017. This involved raising the nose to lower the tail to a workable height, lifting the rudder with our forklift, installing the bolts with a scissor lift on one side and work platform on the other, then carefully lowering the nose to make sure we had sufficient roof clearance as the tail rose. It was a close call, but our building design calculations proved correct and the top of the rudder fitted nicely under the raised roof of the eastern bay of our new display hangar. A fine piece of team work!