DHC-4 A4-225  Our Caribou is in its new home!

SAAM was very happy to have been selected by the Australian Military Sales Office as preferred applicant for DHC-4 Caribou A4-225. This is one of five Caribous that were parked at Oakley Army Aviation Centre, and were subject to a recent disposal tender to Australian Historical Aviation Organisations.

The aircraft was disassembled for transport to the Museum and stored until it could be installed in our new display hangar. It is now inside with the engines and horizontal tail surfaces re-installed, and will be displayed with the starboard wing left in storage so that the aircraft can be positioned close to the hangar wall to conserve badly needed space. The port wing, vertical tail surfaces and propellers will be progressively re-installed.

A4-225 was delivered to the RAAF in June 1965, one of 29 Caribous ordered between 1963 and 1971. It gave 44 years of service  before being retired in 2009. It served with 38 Sqn Detachment A in PNG, where it was used to qualify crews in difficult tropical and terrain conditions before their deployment to Vietnam. It also served in natural disaster relief work – for example, relief operations in Townsville after Cyclone Althea in 1971.

More Photos HERE.

Our new display hangar is COMPLETE!

The new hangar is now ready for occupancy! It has passed all inspections, we have painted the floor, installed a new concrete entrance ramp and extended the hardstand in front of it.

We have started the difficult task of installing aircraft exhibits in it, including the Caribou, Sea Venom, Canberra nose section and the Wessex helicopter.

We will be moving more aircraft and some exciting new acquisitions in over the coming weeks and months.

The project was carried out by Ahrens Construction and is 50% funded under the National Stronger Regions Fund.

Our F-111 Tours make a wonderful gift!!

F-111 Tour flyer - cropped for home pageSome lucky Dads were given Tour Gift Certificates for Fathers’ Day, but really any occasion will do!

This two hour tour is a great way to get up close and personal with the iconic F-111. One of our guides will take you on your individual tour of this great aircraft’s exterior and cockpit and explain its many features.

CLICK HERE for more information about the tour, how to purchase a Tour Gift Certificate and the booking procedure.

 

South Australian Airmen of the Great War

South Australian Airmen of the Great War

(now available online!)

SA Airmen of the Great War Cover - front only

SAAM’s History Group produced this book with historian Chas Schaedel as an ANZAC Centenary project under the Australian Government’s Anzac Centenary Local Grants Program through the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

The book is now available on our website HERE. It is illustrated with a large number of photographs from Chas Schaedel’s collection, and identifies and details the service of over three hundred South Australians who served as airmen during the Great War.

Free copies of the book are available at the Museum for relatives of the airmen listed. Other visitors may purchase a copy in the Museum shop for $10 while stocks last, or you can order online from the publisher at www.avonmorebooks.com.

AVRO ANSON UPDATE

Some significant changes have been made to the Avro Anson since the last update. The most eye catching change has been the installation of the .303 calibre forward firing machine gun. It is a replica and is non- working of course but it is fitted with some replica ammunition and this is fitted into the breech being fed by a link belt. A ring and bead sight has been made and fitted.

The port wing has been finished and is fitted with its aileron and flap. The fuel tank covers are in place and the fuel tanks are fitted. The bomb doors for both the forward and aft bomb bays are installed and working and enough parts have been sourced to make the forward doors operational from the cockpit.

anson resto 2015  anson resto 2015a

The clear vision panels in the nose have all been renewed and the sliding hatch beneath the nose is operational with its wind deflecting clear vision panel made operational. The pitot head has been refurbished and refitted to the bottom of the nose.

The engine cowls are almost complete and most have been primed ready for the next prime coat which will be followed by the colour coat. The rear portions of the cowls are wood frames covered in fabric and are yet to be refurbished.

The undercarriage leg fairings have been remanufactured and are fitted to the legs and are awaiting fabric covering. New tyres have been fitted and have been deliberately “worn in” with the treads removed and some realistic scuffing making them look as if they have been in use on bitumen runways.

The engine air filters, oil coolers and oil tanks have been removed, overhauled, repainted and re-fitted.

The fabric on the fuselage underside is being fitted as are the last wooden stringers. Once this fabric is installed the fuselage covering will be complete.

British built Canberra bombers in the Museum

The South Australian Aviation Museum is in possession of two British built Canberra bombers, WK 165 a B2 type and WD 954 a converted T4 version.

WK 165.

This aircraft was built by A.V.Roe at Woodford in the UK in 1954 and was transferred to RAF service the following year. In January 1956 it was selected to participate in the WRE trials in South Australia. The aircraft was used extensively in airborne photography of weapons during the Maralinga/Woomera tests. In 1963 it was transferred to the Joint Service Trials Unit (JSTU) and remained with this unit until its retirement in December 1969.

The aircraft was struck off charge on the 13th February 1970. It was purchased by Mr Neville Mason, who moved the aircraft from Edinburgh, South Australia, to the Eureka Museum at Ballarat in Victoria.  It was to remain at Ballarat in a dilapidated state for 12 years, (1985-1997).

In 1997 Mr Neville Mason donated the aircraft to the South Australian Aviation Museum. The removal of the aircraft from Ballarat commenced on the 29th May 1997 and took four Museum members (Stephen Nitschke, Peter Ormsby, Barry James and John Hillier) two days to prepare the aircraft for transportation. The wings being 19 feet wide at the fuselage had to be transported a week later under police escort to Adelaide.

Since its inclusion to the Museum register the aircraft has undergone much restoration work. The primary tasks have been; to remove and prevent further corrosion of both external and internal fixtures; to paint the external surfaces, and to replace as many missing parts as possible. It has been necessary to search most overseas and local websites to acquire missing parts, cockpit instruments and control panels being high on the wanted list.

It is expected that this search for replacement parts and the ongoing maintenance on this aircraft will continue well into the future.

CANBERRA   canberra2